Datapac, Ireland’s leading technology solutions and services provider, and Sophos, a global leader in network and endpoint security, today announce the results of a joint survey on security concerns associated with remote working and increased mobility.

The survey found than almost half of Irish office workers – more than 600,000 people – use a personal device, such as a laptop or tablet, for work purposes. However, many do not take adequate measures to secure these devices, and it was found that up to 350,000 office workers use an unencrypted personal device to access or store company data.,This is worrying news.

According to the survey, almost half (45%) of office-based employees in Ireland – amounting to more than 600,000 people2 – use mobile devices, including laptops, tablets and smartphones, to access or store company data, such as work emails or business documents. While increased mobility facilitates flexible and remote working, there remains significant security concerns around the trend.

The survey discovered that many employees fail to implement and maintain adequate security measures on both their work and personal devices. For instance, almost one-in-four office workers (24%) have ignored a security update request on a work device. The vast majority (75%) don’t use two factor authentication – such as a code from a mobile phone – when accessing their company network for remote working on a personal device. Employees using public Wi-Fi pose another risk for businesses, with more 27% admitting to connecting to unsecure public Wi-Fi networks without a password for remote work.

With regards to personal devices used for work purposes, 42% of office workers who use their own devices don’t use any anti-virus software. In fact, 11% of Irish office workers who use their personal devices for work purposes don’t take any measures to ensure their devices are adequately protected and secured.

Karen O’Connor, General Manager, Service Delivery Division, Datapac

Also worrying is that 15% of office workers who use their own devices admitted that they wouldn’t inform their employer if their laptop or other personal device used for work was lost or stolen. The loss of these devices may pose a serious risk to businesses if they are not adequately secured and controlled.

Ricky Knights, Channel Engagement Manager for UK and Ireland, Sophos, commented: “While employers are increasingly providing employees with corporate laptops and phones to enable remote working, basic security measures, such as encryption and anti-virus protection, are often lacking.

“Employers need to understand that this greatly increases the risk of suffering a data breach, which can expose sensitive customer and company information. Mobile device management solutions can help businesses to put security controls in place on these devices and ensure that only approved devices can gain access to the company network.”

Karen O’Connor, General Manager, Datapac, said: “More flexible working options are increasingly in demand by today’s workforce and employers are incorporating greater mobility in an effort to attract the best talent. However, employers must not lose sight of their obligations to protect sensitive data.

“Putting access rights management controls in place, implementing two-factor authentication processes, and restricting network access for unencrypted and unauthorised devices are all essential elements in guarding against hackers and rising cybercrime. With these protective procedures in place, employees can securely enjoy a more flexible workstyle.”

Written by Jim O Brien/CEO

CEO and expert in transport and Mobile tech. A fan 20 years, mobile consultant, Nokia Mobile expert, Former Nokia/Microsoft VIP,Multiple forum tech supporter with worldwide top ranking,Working in the background on mobile technology, Weekly radio show, Featured on the RTE consumer show, Cavan TV and on TRT WORLD. Award winning Technology reviewer and blogger. Part time actor and security professional and brutally honest when it comes to opinions.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.